Mac Mini Hard Drive Temperature Sensor

This is the temp sensor for the 27' Intel iMac from Late 2009 and Mid 2010. These are specific to the hard drive manufacturer you are using. If you are upgrading your hard drive and switching to a different brand, you may need to change this sensor too. This product has new and used options. 922-7789 Ambient Temperature Sensor Cable for iMac 24 inch Late 2006 A1200 MA456LL/A, BTO/CTO. Apple Computer Hard Drive; Apple Graphic Card. Apple iMac 27' A1312 Late 2009 Hard Drive Temp Sensor Cable 593-1063 922-9223 (h. Mac Mini Power Supplies. Mac Mini G4; Mac Mini 2006-2009 (Intel).


  • IMac G5 PowerPC G5 (3.0) 0.00932 CPU T-Diode temp 0.00308 CPU Current Amps 0.01248 CPU Voltage volts 53 Hard drive Celsius Reply to This # CPU temperature and hardware sensor readouts in bash.
  • It gives you peace of mind to know that your Mac is staying cool and if not, which apps, connections are pulling a lot of CPU, or other resource heat (e.g., demand). After all Apple provides Power and Battery monitoring, CPU monitoring, network monitoring available to the user.
  • As you can see, this CPU has been running at a temperature of 46 degrees Celsius and a maximum of 75 degrees Celsius (167 degrees Fahrenheit) and is, therefore, running at a normal temperature.

How do I get CPU temperature and fan speeds in OS X? I understand that information is obtained from IOHWSensor in IOKit, but I'm unable to find any reliable information on how to exactly do t.

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CPU temperature and hardware sensor readouts in bash

I only get this:
% tp.sh -l
PowerBook G4 15' PowerBook3,5 PowerPC G4 (3.2)
(nothing else)

CPU temperature and hardware sensor readouts in bash

PowerBook G4 Titanium don't have a temperature sensor, hence the reason why the script wont give you a proper read out. Rev.A AliBooks and up have these sensors, as well as most G3 PBooks/iBooks.

CPU temperature and hardware sensor readouts in bash

I have a little application called 'Temperature Monitor Lite' that reads the CPU temp and puts it in the menu bar.
So the information must be made available by the system.

CPU temp & HW readouts - macmini doesnt have sensors?!
it would be useful if there was list of which machines had which sensors ... once again apple cant even do the basics; hopefully someones else knows. a gui variation of this script returns almost no info at all for the macminbi :-( cf: http://bbs.applescript.net/viewtopic.php?pid=47578 sigh.

---
mailto:osxinfo _at_ yahoo.ca

CPU temperature and hardware sensor readouts in bash

If you aren't getting any data with this script, look at the output of `ioreg -n IOHWSensor more`. If there aren't any sections that look like:
'Power Management protected data' = '{ theNumberO$
'polling-period' = 5
'current-value' = 2850816
'low-threshold' = 0
'location' = 'HDD BOTTOMSIDE'
'type' = 'temperature'
'high-threshold' = 3538944
'CFBundleIdentifier' = 'com.apple.driver.AppleHWS$
'IOClass' = 'IOHWSensor'
'IOPropertyMatch' = {'device_type'='temp-sensor'}
'version' = 1
'zone' = <00000000>
'IOProbeScore' = 0
'Power Management private data' = '{ this object $
'IOMatchCategory' = 'IODefaultMatchCategory'
'IOProviderClass' = 'IOService'
'sensor-id' = 0
then this thing won't work.
If there ARE some sections like that, then my parsing is off and I should have to fix that.

CPU temperature and hardware sensor readouts in bash

Hi, I wrote this script, and since I sent it in a few days ago a few things have come to my attention. Basically, I was informed that:
'Your function, by coincidence, outputs a value that is ‘close' on some machines when compared to values spewed by some other tools that do the correct interpretation leading to believe that the problem is a simple one.
The correct reading for powerbooks goes like this: The value written in the registry is actually encoded to the hardware sensor. On most machines, the value is a 32 bit int, with the upper word being the degrees in C and the lower word the fractional part of the temperature.
On other machines the value may not even be a temperature, but just some seed for the fan, or needed to be read from the fan itself. In those cases the actual temp cannot be deduced by looking at this value without having the calibration data for the fan (in prom). As you can see this ends up being quite a bit of work it requires custom code for each of the machines or sensor types.'
I'm pretty much a n00b at computer science, and this confused me to no end, so I ended up asking metafilter for help, here:
http://ask.metafilter.com/mefi/25932
and the upshot seemed to be that (for temperature sensors) a more accurate value than (n/2^16) is (( n / 2^13 - n / 2^13 % 1 ) / 2^3) - .5).
I've made up a version of the script that uses that value at http://cutup.org/_2tp, but on my machine it seems to output the same value as before less .5 degrees.
I'm not sure if thats coincidence or if I still have this wrong, and I would appreciate any input on the matter.

CPU temperature and hardware sensor readouts in bash

Check Cpu Temperature Mac Os Catalina

The temperature widget I use shows a value that's 0.5 lower than your first script shows for me. Using the new script, the numbers are off by less than 0.2 on average (yours being a bit lower). Definitely well within good enough range for me.
Thanks for the script, it's nice to have a command line way of checking this.
---
Jayson --When Microsoft asks you, 'Where do you want to go today?' tell them 'Apple.'

CPU temperature and hardware sensor readouts in bash
Wonderful script 31d1, and after reading through the Ask Metafilter thread I see your confusion, though i don't completely understand it as i'm an even fresher n00b than you. Anywhen, my math skill are rather weak, and i was wondering if a Celsius to Fahrenheit conversion is a simple switch of the ' formula or something more complext in translating the output from hex etc? If it is, don't worry about it... get the accuracy confusion out of the way first. That said, us Fahrenheit users would love an °F output. Anyone up for the challenge? I've dicking around with it bout as i said, my math is weak...
CPU temperature and hardware sensor readouts in bash

G5 Dual 2.5Ghz - Seems to work great
tp -l
Power Mac G5 PowerMac7,3 PowerPC G5 (3.0)
29 DRIVE BAY Celsius
51.25 BACKSIDE Celsius
70.5 U3 HEATSINK Celsius
0 SLOT 12V power
0 SLOT 5V power
0 SLOT 3.3V power
0.09988 SLOT COMBINED power
59.25 CPU A AD7417 AMB Celsius
0.00878 CPU A AD7417 AD1 adc
0.00927 CPU A AD7417 AD2 adc
0.00772 CPU A AD7417 AD3 adc
0.00308 CPU A AD7417 AD4 adc
55.5 CPU B AD7417 AMB Celsius
0.00856 CPU B AD7417 AD1 adc
0.00929 CPU B AD7417 AD2 adc
0.00772 CPU B AD7417 AD3 adc
0.00343 CPU B AD7417 AD4 adc

I have a blue G3 tower, motherboard rev. 2, with an upgraded 400MHz G4 inside. All it printed out was a blank line. Could it be that my upgraded CPU's sensors are incompatible with the original ones, or were there never any sensors there to begin with?

CPU temperature and hardware sensor readouts in bash

works as expected, though I had to type
./tp.sh
to run it...hmm.
I'm not so hot w/CLI stuff tho.
Interestingly, the fan rpm is 0
I've never heard this ibook G4's fan come on.
even under intense processing.

CPU temperature and hardware sensor readouts in bash

Excellent, I have been looking for something like this to use rather than VNCing into my server box to check temperatures.
But, on a PowerMac G5 I get this:
Power Mac G5 PowerMac7,3 PowerPC G5 (3.0)
32 DRIVE BAY Celsius
43.375 BACKSIDE Celsius
56.75 U3 HEATSINK Celsius
0 SLOT 12V power
0 SLOT 5V power
0 SLOT 3.3V power
0.03213 SLOT COMBINED power
49.75 CPU A AD7417 AMB Celsius
0.00979 CPU A AD7417 AD1 adc
0.00535 CPU A AD7417 AD2 adc
0.00804 CPU A AD7417 AD3 adc
0.00256 CPU A AD7417 AD4 adc
42.5 CPU B AD7417 AMB Celsius
0.00875 CPU B AD7417 AD1 adc
0.00291 CPU B AD7417 AD2 adc
0.00801 CPU B AD7417 AD3 adc
0.00102 CPU B AD7417 AD4 adc
Note, the CPU AMB readings don't change over time for me. Only the U3 HEATSINK, AD1, AD4 do.
-s
---
-sfn

CPU temperature and hardware sensor readouts in bash
The first script seems to work ok on my G4 Powerbook 1.5 ghz For people like me who do not always use terminal I put it into a applescript for use with hotkeys should be very easy to put in Automator and you may want to put the 'display dialog in a tell block to get the finder to activate.

---
mh

CPU temperature and hardware sensor readouts in bash

No data reported for either a B&W G3/300 Rev 1 or a Mac Mini 1.42. Neither apparently have temperature sensors.

PowerBook G4 12' PowerBook6,1 PowerPC G4 (3.3)
47.75 GPU TOPSIDE Celsius
50.75 CPU BOTTOMSIDE Celsius

Checked against Temperature Monitor Lite, all values within a degree of agreement.

CPU temperature and hardware sensor readouts in bash

you should create a widget for this and submit it to apple. is there a way to get around the whole 'path' thing? :)

CPU temperature and hardware sensor readouts in bash

iBook G4 PowerBook6,7 PowerPC G4 (1.2)
40 PWR/MEMORY BOTTOMSIDE Celsius
43 CPU BOTTOMSIDE Celsius
45.75 GPU BOTTOMSIDE Celsius
0.97876 CPU CORE volts
0 REAR MAIN ENCLOSURE fan RPM
25 BATTERY Celsius
Pretty cool, huh?

CPU temperature and hardware sensor readouts in bash
Not much output on my iMac (non-iSight version). I thought I'd get more:
CPU temperature and hardware sensor readouts in bash

Hello,
I wrote a similar thing as a dashboard widget (http://www.smartsoft.com), and found that the problem is actually quite a bit more complex than expected.
The value in the registry is an encoded value. And the encoding/meaning of the values varies depending on the machine.
So for example, the correct reading for powerbooks goes like this: The value written in the registry is actually encoded to the hardware sensor. On most machines, the value is a 32 bit int, with the upper word being the degrees in C and the lower word the fractional part of the temperature.
On other machines the value may not even be a temperature, but just some seed for the fan, or needed to be read from the fan itself. In those cases the actual temp cannot be deduced by looking at this value without having the calibration data for the fan (in prom). As you can see this ends up being quite a bit of work it requires custom code for each of the machines or sensor type.

To check results, you might want to use this app:
http://bresink.de/osx/HardwareMonitor.html
as a reference.
The guy who wrote it has quite some experience and most probably got it right.

CPU temperature and hardware sensor readouts in bash

Worked on my 12' PB (Tiger)
46.5 HDD BOTTOMSIDE Celsius
46.25 CPU TOPSIDE Celsius
58.75 GPU ON DIE Celsius
1.1228 CPU CORE volts
5720 REAR MAIN ENCLOSURE fan RPM
32 BATTERY Celsius
However, on my Pismo (Panther), I got sed-error:
sed: option requires an argument -- e
usage: sed script [-Ean] [-i extension] [file ...]
sed [-an] [-i extension] [-e script] ... [-f script_file] ... [file ...]
./tp: line 3: s/type//: No such file or directory
sed: option requires an argument -- e
usage: sed script [-Ean] [-i extension] [file ...]
sed [-an] [-i extension] [-e script] ... [-f script_file] ... [file ...]
./tp: line 5: s/temperature/Celsius/: No such file or directory
./tp: line 6: s/current/Amps/: No such file or directory
Any ideas why?
---
http://www.google.com/search?as_q=%22Authored+by%3A+david-bo%22&num=10&hl=en&ie=ISO-8859-1&btnG=

CPU temperature and hardware sensor readouts in bash

Hi,
on my PowerBook i get the following output:
PowerBook G4 15' PowerBook5,6 PowerPC G4 (1.2)
CPU/INTREPID BOTTOMSIDE Celsius 23.5
CPU BOTTOMSIDE Celsius 21.25
PWR SUPPLY BOTTOMSIDE Celsius 19.25
1.25713 CPU CORE volts
0 REAR LEFT EXHAUST fan RPM
0 REAR RIGHT EXHAUST fan RPM
TRACK PAD Celsius 17.5
BATT-TEMP temp 18
0 BATT-CURRENT Amps
so far so good. what makes me a little bit concerned is the fact that the temperatures displayed never change even when i can clearly feel that the machine is getting hotter.... My impression is that the script only displays the tempeatures at startup - looks like the values in ioreg never get updated..... It shouldn't be like this, should it?? Do i have to contact the customer service or what.
cheers

CPU temperature and hardware sensor readouts in bash
CPU temperature and hardware sensor readouts in bash

I ran this script (nice job) and got similar values to 'temperature monitor'. However, that app explicitly states that the values only represent the values at start up and don't change.
I looked at ioreg and noticed that the polling period for the temperature sensors is 18446744073709551615. if that's seconds, then it represents a little over half a trillion years.
Is anyone aware of a way to change these values so polling is more frequent?

After revising script on my iBook G4
was: ioreg changed to: /usr/sbin/ioreg and named it sensors.sh

I created the script sensorChk.sh:
export hisensor=`/Users/me/sensors.sh sort tail -n1`
export hidigits=`echo $hisensor cut -c1-2`
if [ $hidigits -gt 50 ]; then
echo $hisensor
say 'Pardon me! , I'm hot, and I need a break!'
fi

Then added this to crontab:
* * * * * /Users/me/sensorChk.sh

This checks the sensors every minute.
You might need to tweak the 50

API commands and results

Check Cpu Temp Mac Os


Mac

iStatistica supports GET requests to provide specific information:


where xx.xx.xx.xx is the address of your mac and yyyy is the port defined in iStatistica settings.


  • summary_cpuLoad

    CPU utilization number

  • summary_cpuCores

    Number of physical cores

  • summary_cpuLogicalCores

    Number of logical cores

  • cpu_coresActivities

    JSON object containing each core utilization number

  • summary_memoryTotal / summary_memoryTotalText

    Total memory installed in bytes or as localized text

  • summary_memoryInactive / summary_memoryInactiveText

    Inactive memory

  • summary_memoryWired / summary_memoryWiredText

    Wired memory

  • summary_memoryFree / summary_memoryFreeText

    Free memory

  • summary_memoryUsed / summary_memoryUsedText

    Used memory

Check Cpu Temperature Mac Os 11

  • network_ipExternal

    External IP-address

  • network_ipGateway

    IP-address of a router

  • network_ipLocal

    Local IP address

  • network_macGateway

    Router MAC-address

  • network_macLocal

    Computer's MAC-address

  • network_speedDownload / network_speedDownloadText

    Current download speed. Bytes / Text values.

  • network_speedUpload / network_speedUploadText

    Current upload speed. Bytes / Text values.

  • network_downloaded / network_downloadedText

    Downloaded since restart. Bytes / Text values.

  • network_uploadedText / network_uploadedText

    Uploaded since restart. Bytes / Text values.

How To Check Cpu Temperature

  • diskDrives

    JSON object containing all connected drives and free/used space

  • battery_isCharging

    Returns 1 if the battery is charging

  • battery_charge

    Current charge of the battery or UPC

  • battery_cyclesDesigned / battery_cyclesCurrent

    Number of cycles of the battery

  • sensors

    List all sensors and temperatures in C

  • fans

    List all fans and RPM data

  • diskIO_write / diskIO_writeText

    Bytes written to disk since restart

  • diskIO_read / diskIO_readText

    Bytes read from disk since restart

  • /

    Get all the data that iStatistica provides as a JSON object

There is no denying the fact that macOS Monterey is more efficient than other desktop operating systems including Windows. But, that doesn’t mean the OS is without any quirks or pain-points. If the lack of a native feature to disable Turbo Boost seems annoying, the inability to check CPU temperature on Mac feels nothing less than a classic puzzle. While Activity Monitor does offer a way to view how apps and other processes are impacting the CPU, GPU, energy, disk, memory, and network usage, the built-in task manager is still quite limited and lacks a clear cut feature to show the current temperature of CPU on macOS. But fret not, this is where the terminal and third-party Mac apps come into effect.

How to View CPU Temperature on macOS

Mac mini 2010 hard drive thermal sensor

Mac Mini Hard Drive Temperature Sensor Location

Before getting started with steps, let’s clear out a couple of fundamental questions! If you just want to jump ahead to the methods for checking CPU temperature on Mac, use the table of contents below to skip ahead.

Why Do You Need to Track the CPU Temperature on Your Mac?

There are multiple reasons why you may want to keep a track of the CPU temperature on macOS. Maybe you are trying to benchmark your newly bought machine or maybe you would like to find out when actually the fans get going. Moreover, it can also let you figure out whether or not you are overkilling the CPU by playing some of the best free Mac games or allowing resource hogging apps to run amuck.

So, What’s the Ideal CPU Temperature?

As the normal CPU temperature varies from model to model, it’s a bit difficult to point out a precise number that can be the best representative for all. However, if I were to break it down in simple term I would say that the cooler the CPU temperature is, the better it is for the health of your computer.

The normal room temperature 22-24 degrees celsius is ideal for CPU temp. But even if the computer runs 10 degrees celsius above the ambient level, it’s still fairly okay. Long story short, the normal CPU temperature must be around 45-65 degrees for a healthy system. So, if the number goes above this normal level, you must think of cutting down the workload of the CPU. Now that the talk is over, it’s time to run through the quick steps.

Check CPU Temperature in Mac Using Terminal

Even though there are plenty of third party apps that you can use to check the CPU temperature in macOS, you don’t need to rely on them because the Terminal can help you figure it out as well. Here’s how to check the CPU temperature in Mac using the Terminal:

  • Launch the Terminal and type in the following command:

Tip: In case the command doesn’t work for you, try typing it in manually instead of copy-pasting it from this article. There are some reports of the quotation marks causing trouble unless typed in manually in the Terminal.

  • Press enter and you should be able to see the temperature of your Mac CPU.

Note: This method only works with Intel Macs. If you’re using an M1 powered Mac, try using the following methods.

Check CPU Temperature of M1 Mac (Mac with Apple Silicon)

If you’re looking for a third party app to help you keep track of your MacBook’s CPU temperatures, look no further than TG Pro. This is one of the only apps I’ve found that works for both Intel and M1 Macs. Here’s how to use it.

  • Install TG Pro (download) on your Mac (make sure you download the version for Intel or Apple Silicon based on your Mac)
  • Launch the app and you will see it show up as a menu bar app, complete with your CPU temperatures on the icon itself. You can also see more detailed information within the app window.

Images

Unfortunately, TG Pro doesn’t offer a widget. But personally, I prefer having such apps on my menu bar instead of in the widget screen on my Mac. TG Pro is a paid app, and while you get a 15 day free trial, you will have to get a license ($10) to continue using it.

If you have an M1 Mac, you have no other choice than using TG Pro. However, if you’re using an Intel Mac, you can check out some of the other apps on this list that might suit you better, and some of them are even free.

Check CPU Temperature on macOS Using Fanny App

Whenever I think of tracking CPU temperature on macOS, the one app that instantly comes to my mind is Fanny. Probably the best part about it is the ability to work as a native macOS feature. Once you have installed this app and set it up (that requires hardly a couple of steps), you can take a quick glance at many performance defining aspects like CPU/GPU temp. What’s more, it’s available for free.

1. To get started, download Fanny on your Mac.

2. Once you have downloaded the app, click on the Notification Center icon (three stacked horizontal lines) at the top right corner of the screen.

Alternatively, you can swipe to the left from the right edge of the trackpad to access Notification Center on your computer.

3. Now, ensure that the Today tab is selected. Then, click on 1New at the bottom.

4. Next, click on the “+” button to the right of Fanny.

That’s pretty much it! From now onwards, you can check the CPU temperature of your macOS device right from the Notification Center.

Besides, you can also click on Fanny’s menu bar icon to view your Mac’s current CPU temperature. Aside from showing the CPU temperature, this handy app also lets you keep a track of the current speed, target speed, minimum speed, maximum speed, number of fans, and GPU temperature on your computer.

Other Apps for Viewing CPU Temperature on Mac

While Fanny remains the most loved notification center widget for tracking the CPU temperature along with other important system information of Mac, there are a couple of notable apps that are more proficient. And if you don’t mind spending a few dollars for extra functionalities, they would be worth taking a look.

1. Monit

Should you want to go for a slightly more feature-rich CPU temperature tracking Mac app, I would recommend you to try out Monit. The app works efficiently in offering a quick way to check out the key performance data of Mac. For instance, you can use this app to check out several important performance defining things like CPU, network, disk, memory, and even battery. Though this notification center widget comes at $2.99, it’s worth the price considering the notable features and reliable performance.

Price:$2.99

'Can I Simply Remove The Broken Thermal Sensor, So That It Relies On Just The One Intact Sensor?'No, Your Best Bet Is To Get A Replacement Sensor.h...

2. iStat Menus

2010 Mac Mini Hard Drive Temperature Sensor

For the folks who are looking for a complete menubar system manager, iStat Menus is hands down the best bet. What gives it an edge over many other rivals is the ability to show a wide range of key performance metrics including CPU, GPU, memory, disk usage, network usage, disk activity, battery, and more. Moreover, this macOS app is fully customizable so that you can hide unwanted information and make it show only the metrics that matter to you. But keep in mind all these goodies will cost ($10) you way more than other apps.

Price:$9.99

Keep a Track of the Current CPU Temperature of Your Mac with Ease

So, that’s how you can keep an eye on the CPU temperature of your Mac. Since I’m using an M1 MacBook Air, I have to rely on using third party apps like TG Pro. However, I would love to have a native macOS feature for keeping a track of my CPU temperature on M! Macs with macOS Monterey. Hopefully, Apple introduces it soon. Have any feedback? Feel free to share your thoughts in the comments and also let us know which one of these apps have been able to catch your attention.