European Air War Game Download

PILOTÕS GUIDE

European Air War or 'EAW' is a Game / Flight Simulator for PC ('Windows') published in 1998 by Microprose. The game was improved by community member contributors independently since then. As of this date 2021 it is still modified.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

BOOK 1: GAME PLAYERS’ GUIDE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .viii

REQUIREMENTS AND INSTALLATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

The Technical Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

Installing the Game . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3

THE CONTROLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5

Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

DIFFICULTY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

CONTROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11

GRAPHICS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

SOUND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

Keyboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

PAUSING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

QUITTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

Mouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

Joystick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15

Pedals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16

THE MAIN MENU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

QUICK START . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

FLYING A SINGLE MISSION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

The Hangar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Mission Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

TIME PERIOD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

TIME OF DAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25

WEATHER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

INSTANT ACTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

MISSION TYPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

TARGET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28

NUMBER OF AIRCRAFT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

CRUISE ALTITUDE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28

HOME BASE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28

FRIENDLY SUPPORT ACTIVITY: SECONDARY AIRCRAFT . . . . . . . . . . . . .29

FORMATION SIZE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

PILOT SKILL LEVEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

BOOK 1: GAME PLAYER’S GUIDE

EXPECTED ENEMY ACTIVITY: ACTIVITY LEVEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30

PRIMARY AIRCRAFT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30

SECONDARY AIRCRAFT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30

AAA ACTIVITY LEVEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31

SAVING A MISSION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31

LOADING A MISSION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

MAKING REVISIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Armaments Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Fly Mission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Take-off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

European Air War Game Download

Getting There . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

The Cockpit Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

MISSION MAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

COCKPIT RADIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

AUTOPILOT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

Viewpoint and the Camera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

F-KEYVIEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

SNAP VIEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

CHANGING PLANES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

TARGETING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

VIRTUAL COCKPIT MODE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

PADLOCK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

THE EXTERNAL CAMERA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Accelerating Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Encountering the Enemy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

IDENTIFICATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

GROUND TARGETS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48

CYCLING YOUR GUNS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48

DOGFIGHTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49

PADLOCK AND TARGETING FEATURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49

DIVE BOMBING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50

STRAFING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51

FIRING ROCKETS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53

Getting Shot Down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53

Returning and Landing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53

Debriefing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55

CAREER PILOT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57

Creating a Pilot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58

Loading a Career . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60

The Briefing Room . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61

The Hangar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62

ARMAMENT BOARD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62

FLY MISSION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62

The Aerial Campaign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63

BATTLE LINES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63

CHANGING BASES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63

REPAIRS AND REPLACEMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64

PILOT FATIGUE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64

COCKPIT RADIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64

RESCUE, CAPTURE, AND DEATH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64

Debriefing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65

Medals and Promotions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65

Barracks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66

LOGBOOK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66

VIEW MEDALS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67

RADIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67

LEAVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67

BUNK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67

Tour of Duty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67

Squadron CommanderÕs Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68

SQUADRON BOARD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68

The End of the War . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69

Hall of Fame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70

MULTI-PLAYER MISSIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71

Connecting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72

IPX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73

TCP/IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73

MODEM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73

SERIAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74

Joining a Mission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74

Hosting a Mission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75

Session Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75

BOOK 1: GAME PLAYER’S GUIDE

Flying a Multi-Player Mission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77

COMMUNICATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77

DEATH DURING TOTAL MAYHEM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77

PLAYER KILLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78

The End of the Game . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78

Newsreel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79

View Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79

BOOK 2: PILOT’S HANDBOOK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83

WHY YOU’RE HERE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83

THEORIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 THE COMBATANTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85 The Battle of Britain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92

THE FALL OF FRANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92 ENGLAND STANDS ALONE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94 CHANNEL RAIDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96 THE CALM BEFORE THE STORM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 THE STORM BREAKS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99 ADLERTAG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 THE BATTLE CONTINUES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106 LONDON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109 THE CRISIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111

Fortress without a Roof . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113

THESE MAD AMERICANS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113 SCHWEINFURT/REGENSBURG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116 OPERATION ARGUMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120 BIG ÒBÓ, MARCH 6, 1944 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122 PREPARING FOR INVASION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126 SUPPORTING THE INVASION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129 OPERATION BODENPLATTE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130 THE FALL OF THE THIRD REICH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .132

Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133

AREA BOMBING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133 STRATEGIC BOMBING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .133 THE INTERDICTION CAMPAIGN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .134

FLIGHT SCHOOL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .135

The Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136

ESSENTIAL AERODYNAMICS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .136

LEVEL FLIGHT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142

ACCELERATION AND DECELERATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .142

LEVEL CLIMB AND LEVEL DESCENT (RISING AND FALLING) . . . . . . . .143

CLIMBS AND DIVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .143

SIMPLE TURNS (BANKING) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .145

FINAL ADVICE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .145

Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .146

COMPASS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .147

ARTIFICIAL HORIZON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .147

AIRSPEED INDICATOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .147

TACHOMETER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148

ALTIMETER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148

OIL PRESSURE GAUGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .148

ENGINE TEMPERATURE GAUGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .149

FUEL GAUGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .149

MANIFOLD PRESSURE GAUGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150

RATE OF CLIMB INDICATOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150

AMMUNITION COUNTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151

Formations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151

ECHELON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .151

V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .152

FINGER FOUR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .152

BOMBERS AND ESCORTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .153

Simple Manoeuvres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .154

AILERON ROLL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .154

BARREL ROLL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155

LOOP OVER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155

LOOP UNDER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .156

WING OVER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .157

Emergency Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158

RECOVERING FROM A STALL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .159

THE POWER STALL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .160

GETTING OUT OF A SPIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .163

LOW FUEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .164

DAMAGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .166

COMING IN ON A WING AND A PRAYER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .167

FIRE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .168

BOOK 1: GAME PLAYER’S GUIDE

BAILING OUT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .169

Advanced Flight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .171

A LITTLE AIR COMBAT THEORY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .171

YOUR WEAPONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .179

APPROACH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .185

DOGFIGHT VS. HIT-AND-RUN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .186

IMMELMANN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .187

SPLIT-S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .188

INTENTIONAL STALL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .189

SKID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .190

SLIP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .190

SCISSORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .191

THACH WEAVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .192

ADVANCED MANOEUVRING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .194

Some Further Advice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200

TACTICAL QUICKIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200

ALTERNATIVE DELIVERY TECHNIQUES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202

LANDINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210

THE COCKPITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217

Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218

United States Army Air Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219

LOCKHEED P-38 LIGHTNING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220

REPUBLIC P-47 THUNDERBOLT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222

NORTH AMERICAN P-51 MUSTANG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224

Royal Air Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226

HAWKER HURRICANE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227

HAWKER TEMPEST V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229

HAWKER TYPHOON MK IB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231

SUPERMARINE SPITFIRE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233

Luftwaffe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235

FOCKE WULF FW190 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236

MESSERSCHMITT BF109 (ME109) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239

MESSERSCHMITT ME110 (DESTROYER) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242

MESSERSCHMITT ME262A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244

GLOSSARY OF TERMS AND ACRONYMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246

CUSTOMER SUPPORT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253

CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .255

BOOK 1: GAME PLAYER’S GUIDE

Great Britain and France declared war on Germany in early September of 1939, a mere two days after Germany had invaded Poland. Less than a year later, France would be occupied and England fighting for her own independence. Thus began the European campaign of the Second World War. The conflict flared on ground and at sea, bloody and hard-fought, but it would be in the air that the war was won.

Most of the fighting over Europe was too high for people down below to see. The sole signs of the melee overhead were the distant buzz of engines and the occasional wreck, yet battle was no less fierce in the air than on the ground. With only a thin skin of metal as a shield, pilots had little room for error. Their fate was in their own hands. Success was, of course, only fleetingÑfailure often final.

From the Battle of Britain in the summer months of 1940 until the day of Axis capitulation five years later, the worldÕs military leaders engaged in a struggle for control of the skies over western Europe. Aerial support was key to any offensive assault and a principle means of defense as well. Crippling a nation was as simple as wearing down its supply of pilots and planes.

In European Air Warª, you step into the cockpit of a 1940Õs fighter plane and join your countryÕs daily struggle to achieve air superiority. Germany is wearing away the RAFÕs resources. The Allies strive to beat back the onslaught and shove their way straight to Berlin. Now you assume your place in the pilotÕs seat.

This book, the Game PlayerÕs Guide, contains complete instructions on installing, running, configuring, and playing European Air Warª The PilotÕs Handbook (later in this manual) has historical background and a little advice on piloting. The Quick Reference Card is a one-stop reference to all of the keyboard, mouse, joystick, and other controls. Changes made to the game after this manual was written are described in the Readme file; that file was written last, so any notations in it supersede all other information.

YouÕve got the box open, the CD-ROM in your hands, your flight jacket on, and that manic gleam in your eyes. What do you do now?

THE TECHNICAL PREREQUISITES

For European Air War to work, there are a few things your computer must have.

The processor has to be a 166 MHz Pentium or better. If you have a 3D graphics acceleration card, you can play on a 133 MHz Pentium.

You must have at least 32 Mb (megabytes) of RAM (working memory).

You must have a CD-ROM drive.

Since the installation program will copy parts of European Air War onto your hard disk, you must have a lot of empty storage space on your hard drive. How much you need depends on how much of the game you choose to install; the different amounts are calculated for you by the installation program, and it shows you what you need versus what you have.

Your computer must be capable of SVGA quality graphics.

There must be a working mouse (or a device that fulfills the same function) attached to the computer.

You must have DirectX version 6.0 (or higher). If you donÕt have this, you can install version 6.0 as part of the installation process. To use the gameÕs 3Dfx Glide support, you must have Glide API version 2.43 (or higher) installed and working.

There are also a few pieces of equipment that we strongly recommend you have:

To hear the game, you must have a sound card and the requisite drivers to support DirectSound.

To fly well, we recommend you use a joystick. We encourage the use of throttle controls and foot pedals (for the rudder).

For modem play, we recommend you use a modem capable of 28.8 kps or faster.

If you think you have all of these, but still have a problem running the game, please contact MicroProse Customer Support for assistance.

INSTALLING THE GAME

Before you can play European Air War, the installation program must copy some files onto your hard disk. To have it do so, follow these instructions:

Turn on your computer. Windows 95 should load the Microsoft CD-ROM Extension when the computer starts up. (If you have problems installing, this extension may not be loaded. Check your computer manuals for instructions on getting it loaded.)

Open the CD-ROM drive, place the European Air War CD in it, and close the drive.

European Air War is a Windows 95 ÒAutoPlayÓ CD-ROM. That means that just putting the disk in the drive for the first time starts up the installation program.

Click on Install to continue. (If you change your mind at this point, click Exit.)

As is usual in Windows 95 installation procedures, there are two decisions you need to make before the installation process can begin. The first decision is to what directory you want to install the game. You can accept the default, type in a directory path, or use the Browse button to seek out a directory. Click OK when youÕre done.

The second decision is what sort of installation you want to do. Pick one of the options presented:

Typical installs the required program files and some other stuff. This type of installation strikes a balance between the needs of game speed (more files copied) versus conserving hard disk space (less files copied).

Compact is the minimum; it installs only the required program files.

Custom gives you control of what gets installed. How much disk space this takes up depends on what you select.

European Air War will now copy the files you selected to your hard drive from the CD-ROM.

After the game itself has been copied over, European Air War installs a few necessary utility programs. These include MicrosoftÕs DirectX drivers (version 6.0). The space these take up was included in the total noted on screen.

3

Lastly, use the check-boxes to decide whether to add a shortcut on your desktop for this game and whether to begin the game immediately when the installation is done.

Once the installation is complete, the game is ready to play.

If you checked the play box, the game begins right away. If you forgot, you can still start playing now:

Leave the European Air War CD-ROM in the drive.

Click the Play button.

To play later:

Make sure that the European Air War CD-ROM is in its drive.

If you checked the shortcut box, click on the European Air War shortcut on your desktop.

If not, open the Windows 95 Start menu, then open the European Air War sub-menu, then click the European Air War option.

You can also wait for the AutoPlay menu to pop up, then click the Play button.

Have fun!

THE CONTROLS

European Air War is an advanced, complex, historical military simulation. You cannot play if you use only keyboard controls. Use of a mouse is absolutely necessary, and a joystick comes in handy, too. In fact, we strongly recommend that you use both.

What follows is a brief introduction to the use of the configurable game options and the standard game controllers. European Air War is designed to work with most of the available Windows 95 compatible flight simulation add-on hardware systems (ÒperipheralsÓ). If you follow the installation instructions and the documentation that came with the peripheral youÕre using, you should not have any problems. Customer Support will likely be able to solve whatever trouble you do encounter. Calibration settings for joysticks and other hardware is taken from Windows data; if you installed the hardware correctly, you should have no need to recalibrate just for this game.

CONFIGURATION

The first time you fire up European Air War, before you even consider stepping into the cockpit, you should click on the Configure Game button. Use the configuration setup to specify how you want to control the game, as well as to adjust the settings of such things as sound, screen resolution, and level of detail.

DIFFICULTY

These three menusÑFlight, Combat, and DisplayÑlet you adjust the level of realism and difficulty of each mission you fly. As you enable more realistic settings, the overall Difficulty Rating increases, thus increasing your score at the end of every mission (a reward for playing at a harder level).

Flight

Flight Model Depending on your abilities and what you want out of this game, you can decide whether to use a Realistic flight modelÑwith all the difficulty of piloting a real aircraftÑor an Easy one, which is more forgiving.

Stalls/Spins This option, when enabled, makes it possible for your plane to stall (when your speed is below that needed to sustain lift) or go into a spin. Turn this option Off, and stalls and spins will not occur unless your plane has been damaged.

Torque Effect Radial engines create a turning force known as torque (see the PilotÕs Handbook for details). Pilots of single-engine planes must take this into account. Twin-engine machines donÕt suffer the same pull, because their engines rotate in opposite directions and cancel the torque effect. If Torque Effect is Off, your plane will show no signs of pulling. However, when this is toggled On, single-engine aircraft will pull one side according to their manufacture. Torque has no effect when the autopilot is engaged, since the autopilot makes the necessary corrections.

Blackout

While designers can tinker with planes to make them react better

Redout

at high acceleration, itÕs harder to enhance the human bodyÕs

performance under similar conditions. High-speed manoeuvres

can prevent a pilotÕs heart from pumping enough blood into his

brain. When an airman pulls hard out of a dive, turns his aircraft

tightly at top speeds, or performs other high-speed aerial moves,

he may lose consciousnessÑblack out.

Forcing too much blood into the brain (as when throttling forward

into a steep dive) is also a problem. If the pressure becomes too

great, tiny blood vessels in the pilotÕs eyes burst. This is known as

a Òredout.Ó Severe brain damage or death can result.

Losing consciousness is especially dangerous at low altitudes,

when you have too little time to recover, but even at great heights

it poses serious risks. These days, pressurized suits help fighter

pilots maintain control at high speeds. During World War II, such

suits were too bulky and unpredictable to be practical, so pilots

had to know their own limits.

If you enable blackouts, you subject yourself to the laws of nature

and human limitations. If not, youÕll maintain both vision and

consciousness even when performing unheard-of aerial feats.

7

This pilot is at risk of blacking out.

Engine

Even when equipped with complex cooling systems, engines

Overheat

generate a lot of heat, and the harder they have to work, the more

heat they put out. ItÕs possible to damage an engine if you run it

too hard for too long. In some planes, holding the throttle fully

open for as few as ten seconds can lead to overheating, and

overheating can quickly escalate into permanent engine

damageÑor complete failure. When Engine Overheat is

disabled, you can run your craft all day without once approaching

the danger point. If you opt for a more realistic scenario, beware a

heavy hand on the throttle.

Structural

Even the sturdiest and most dependable of planes has its

Limits

limitations. When itÕs pushed beyond them, anything can

happen, from the annoyingÑlike buffeting in a diveÑto the

downright dangerous. A craft can fall into a spin or a stall, or a

wing might break off in mid-flight and leave you plummeting

helplessly back to the ground.

By selecting On, you open yourself up to many irksome but

realistic problems that pilots of the day had to contend with.

Leaving the option in the Off position, you avoid such

troublesome issues and can push your plane beyond its

physical limits.

Wind/

When enabled, this option makes flying a bit harder, because

Turbulence

wind can slow you down, adjust your course, and generally

complicate things. Select Off if you do not wish to have your

course deviate due to the effects of wind and turbulence.

Combat

Enemy

This option provides a quick and easy way to modify the overall

Skill Level

difficulty. You can choose between Green (to face inexperienced

pilots), Veteran (pilots who have been in a few dogfights), and

Ace (the most experienced the enemy has to offer). Be

forewarned that the enemy skill level Ace is designed to push

even the most fanatic flight simulation veterans to the limits of

their abilities.

Landing

A combat pilot can count on very few certainties, but one thing is

sureÑwhat goes up must come down. Assuming that you havenÕt

bailed out or showered down in a thousand pieces somewhere

over Europe, you know that youÕre going to have to land your

crate. How you do that depends on your plane and your piloting

prowess. Some planes are easier than others to set down, but

bringing one in for a successful landing always requires skill and

an excellent knowledge of your machine. When you enable

Realistic, you must cope with the vagaries of bringing your craft

in manually. If you select Simple, touching down is a much

simpler affair.

Realistic

In actual air-to-air combat during World War II, it was no mean

Gunnery

feat to hit your target. Pilots needed great skill and marksmanship

(and sometimes luck) to down an enemy plane. Fortunately, in

European Air War it doesnÕt have to be that difficult. Using a

more blocky, less-than-precise silhouette of enemy aircraft to

determine hits can turn many near misses into scores. Of course,

if youÕd rather have the greater challenge, that can be arranged,

too. If Realistic Gunnery is off, youÕll have a slightly easier time

finding your mark. With the option on, hits on enemy aircraft are

determined using a slimmer and more realistic silhouette.

9

The limited range of World War II weapons means that air-to-air combat takes place at close quarters. For your guns to be effective, you have to be frighteningly near your target. Mid-air collisions are of great concern; especially in the heat of battle, itÕs easy to lose track of whoÕs around you and where exactly they are. This can be a fatal slip if Mid-Air Collision is enabledÑaircraft coming into contact with each other explode in a fireball. With quick reflexes you might bail out, but at best youÕll be headed for a dirt bath or a dousing. If you leave this option off, one aircraft can pass right through another without effect.

Ammunition is a valued commodity in aerial combat. Armed, youÕre a lethal threat, but when you run out of ammo, you must break off the attack and head home, vulnerable the entire flight. Every plane has weight and storage restrictions that limit how much ammunition the ground crews can pack on board. During the Second World War, a full load of bullets could be measured in seconds of firepower. In addition, most pilots had to estimate their remaining rounds without benefit of the ammunition counters now standard on warplanes. If you enter battle without Unlimited Ammo, be advised to use your weapons judiciously. If you opt instead for a limitless supply, just try not to give yourself away by the unrestrained use of your guns. (Note that this option is always Off in multi-player missions.)

Invulnerable This option allows you to designate whether or not your plane takes damageÑfrom enemy fire, friendly fire, the ground, or anything else. If you want to practice flying without having to worry about damage, set this option On. When youÕre ready to fly in a real dogfight, turn this back Off. (Note that this option is always Off in multi-player missions.)

Display

Display Unit This option controls what system of measurement is used by your commanding officers, your cockpit instruments, and your map. Select English to use the Imperial system or Metric for (oddly enough) the metric system. If you choose Default, each nationality uses the system they had in place at the time of the war.

You can use this to turn on the cockpit Head-Up Display, which is something no pilot during the war actually had. This projects useful information in front of you.

There are two types of altimeter. The type used during the war gives readings based on ambient air pressure. This is ASL (Above Sea Level). Modern radar altimeters read altitude AGL (Above Ground Level). During the war, planes did not use radar altimeters, and the description of the altimeter in this manual reflects that. If you choose to use AGL, that description no longer applies.

Airspeed

Select the way you want the Airspeed Indicator in your cockpit to

Display

work. IAS (Indicated Air Speed) measures your velocity relative to

the air around you; this is the type of indicator used in WWII-era

planes. TAS (True Air Speed) measures your actual rate of

movement relative to the ground below you; this is more reliable

for navigation, but less historically accurate.

CONTROL

This is where you designate exactly what hardware youÕll use to control which aspects of the gameÑand exactly what controls correspond to which commands.

The Flight Control is the important one; itÕs the main instrument for flying your aircraft. Selections for the other options might change or be limited depending on what you select here. In general, for instance, you cannot use the same instrument as both Flight Control and for controlling the external cameraÑthe exception being that if your joystick is your flight control, you can use the joystick ÒhatÓ to manoeuvre the camera.

11

To customize (or completely reconfigure) the controls for the game, select Advanced. This option gives you control over all four groups of controlsÑView controls, Flight controls, Weapon controls, and general Game controls.

When youÕre done, click OK to save your changes or Cancel to undo them.

GRAPHICS

The options on this screen influence how everything in every mission looks. Generally, more detail makes playing the game more realistic and fun, but it also tends to slow down the gameÕs operation. If you notice that your plane doesnÕt respond as quickly as you would like, or that movements on the screen are jerky, you may need to lower the level of detail. Adjusting the settings to lower detail levels or turning some of the options off should result in a smoother picture and faster responses.

Make sure you select the correct 3D Renderer optionÑthe type of 3D acceleration youÕre using. You can also adjust your distance visibility. The higher the visibility, the farther you (and other pilots) can see.

If the background or the colour level is darker than you would prefer, try sliding the Gamma Correction to the right to brighten the entire viewing area.

SOUND

The Sound screen lets you control not only the volume of game sounds but also their quality. Choose between 8-bit and 16-bit sound. The higher setting (16-bit) sounds better, but requires quite a bit more memory, as well. You can also determine the number of sound effect channels; generally, more channels means better quality, though you are limited by what your computerÕs capabilities.

You adjust the levels for the different sound effects and the music separately. Click anywhere along a line or drag the volume controls where you want them. Bear in mind that the engine sound effects can clue you in to the health of your planeÑyour engine may begin to labour before it actually fails. You can only react in time if you hear the change in pitch. You probably donÕt want to turn these sound effects completely off.

The last option in the sound configuration allows you to turn the subtitles on or off. The officer presenting your briefings speaks in the language of his homeland, as do all pilots on your radio. Thus, for example, if you are flying a German plane, but you do not understand German, you would turn this option on to have your briefing information and communications subtitled in your native language.

KEYBOARD

The keyboard is the primary control device for your computer, but it is often a secondary controller while playing European Air War. Keystroke commands are most commonly used to change the viewpoint while flying, to enter text in certain fields (naming pilots, for example), and to control things like the throttle, gear, and brakes.

Keyboard controls are represented in this manual by symbols. Thus, for example, Function Key #1 would appear as 1, just as it does on the keyboard itself. Key combinations that should be pressed at the same time are separated by plus signs, as in c+a+d. All keys will be capitalized, but you do not need to enter capital letters. (A capital P, for example, would appear as s+P, while a lowercase p would be P.) We use the standard abbreviations for the special keys.

Though some of the keyboard commands are described in the relevant sections, please refer to the Quick Reference Card for the exact default keystrokes used in controlling European Air War. You can change many of these defaults using the Control option on the Configure Game menu, described in Configuration. There are some keyboard command standards that are shared by virtually all

MicroProse games.

Note that on most of the game screens (not during missions), you can use the zto toggle labelling of all the hot spots on and off. This can be quite helpful when you arenÕt sure exactly what you can do on a particular screen. You can also right-click to briefly view the hot spots; they stay visible as long as you hold down the [RMB].

13

PAUSING

At any time while in flight, you can press a+Pto pause the game. All action in the game will stop until you restart it, but you still have control of the external camera and the viewpoint controls. Note that none of the controls except those relevant to the camera and viewpoints will function while the game is paused. To restart the action, press a+Pagain.

QUITTING

The Main menu includes an Exit option for leaving the game, but real life doesnÕt always allow enough time to work your way back to this menu to quit. To leave European Air War at any time, you can press a+Q. The game prompts you to verify that you want to quit. Note that if you are in the middle of a career mission when you quit, your career continues with that mission when you come back to the game.

If you wish to end your current mission without shutting down the whole game, press q. You must verify this command. If you do, you proceed directly to your debriefing, and the mission is counted a failure unless you completed your objective before quitting.

MOUSE

If you do not have a joystick attached to your system, the mouse is likely to be the primary controller for European Air War. Even if you do have both a mouse and a joystick, the mouse is important. The mouse is necessary for selecting from menus and maps and moving around the briefing screens.

Mouse controls are represented in this manual in a manner similar to keyboard controls. Thus, for example, the Left Mouse Button would appear as LMB. Directional controls are represented by ÒmouseÓ commands in bracketsÑ[Mouse Left], for example.

Throughout this manual, we stick to the standard terms for using the mouse:

ÔClickÕ means to click the left mouse button (LMB).

ÔÔRight-clickÕ means to click the right mouse button (RMB).

ÔÔDragÕ means to hold down the LMB while you move the mouse.

ÔÔRight-dragÕ should be obvious enough.

ÔÔDouble-clickÕ means to click the LMB twice rapidly.

The mouse controls for the external camera are described in the relevant section. You can also use the Quick Reference Card as a quick reference. The mouse motions used to fly the plane are summarized here. You can change these defaults using the Control option on the Configure Game menu, described in

Configuration.

[Mouse Fwd] Stick forward, nose down (dive)

[Mouse Back] Stick back, nose up (climb)

[Mouse Left] Stick left, bank left (left turn)

[Mouse Right] Stick right, bank right (right turn)

JOYSTICK

If you have access to one, itÕs best to use a joystick as the primary control device for European Air War. Even in tandem with a mouse, the joystick is essentialÑa joystick is the optimum controller for the plane in flight.

Directional controls are represented in this manual by ÒstickÓ commandsÑ[Stick Left], for example. Joystick controls other than those for flight are described in the relevant sections. You can also use the Quick Reference Card as a quick reference. The default joystick controls used to fly the plane are standard and fairly obvious; they are summarized here. You can change some of these defaults using the Control option on the Configure Game menu, described in

Configuration.

[Stick Fwd] Elevators down, nose down (dive)

[Stick Back] Elevators up, nose up (climb)

[Stick Left] Bank left (left turn)

[Stick Right] Bank right (right turn)

[Button 1]

Fire guns

[Button 2] Fire Selected Weapon

PEDALS

Foot pedals are optional hardware for controlling the rudder of the plane. If you do not have rudder pedals, donÕt worry; European Air War also allows you to control the rudder from the keyboard, joystick, or mouse. Using rudder control, several useful manoeuvres are available to you that are not possible using the stick alone.

Rudder pedal controls (rudder controls in general, in fact) are represented in this manual in bold type and enclosed in brackets. Thus, for example, sliding the left pedal forward and the right pedal back would appear as [Rudder Left]. The direction of the control (i.e. ÒleftÓ or ÒrightÓ) is based on the direction in which the control motion moves the rudder, as is standard in aviation.

The rudder is the pilotÕs only direct method of controlling the yaw of the plane. (Please refer to ÔYawÕ in the Glossary for a brief definition.) The primary uses of the rudder are to counteract the adverse yaw caused by banking with the ailerons and to steer the plane while on the runway. The rudder can also be helpful when youÕre making those little sideways adjustments as you approach the runway. The two pedal controls are as follows:

[Rudder Left] Yaw left (counteract adverse yaw of right bank)

[Rudder Right] Yaw right (counteract adverse yaw of left bank)

THE MAIN MENU

Once the opening animation has come to an end, European Air WarÕs Main menu appears. From this panel, you control how you will enter the European Theatre of Operations. You can join the battle for a few brief months in the early years of the war, fighting over Britain and the English Channel for victory and the greater glory of your country, or sign on in 1943 for the duration of the hostilities over Europe. You might even choose to test your wings and your daring on a single mission into the depths of enemy territory. Once the battle has cooled, you can brush up on the overall aerial campaign with special features like European Air WarÕs Newsreel, also found on the Main menu.

Main menu screen

Quick Start This is the fastest way to jump into the cockpit and get your first taste of air combat.

Single Mission Design and fly individual missions for either the Axis or the Allies. Single missions are a good way to practice in preparation for a piloting career.

Start your career as a pilot for the RAF, USAAF, or Luftwaffe.

Choose how to control your aircraft and other aspects of the game.

Test your aerial combat skills against those of your friends.

Watch brief films on some of the major aerial operations in

European Air War.

View Objects ExamineÑin detailÑall the planes in European Air War.

Exit

Quit the game and return control to Windows.

BOOK 1: GAME PLAYER’S GUIDE

Our thanks to RAF Wing Commander James Isles (Retired) for these brief insights into the air war in defense of England, and for all the other information he so thoughtfully supplied.

A PERSONAL EXPERIENCE OF A CIVILIAN

The Sunday morning of 3rd September 1939 was beautifully sunny and warm, with the first tints of autumn beginning to appear. On this particular morning, I had motored from my home in North Berkshire to be with my future wife, who was at that time nursing at Lord Mayor TreloarÕs Hospital at Alton.

For many months, there had been speculation whether or not there would be war or peace in Europe in our time, since Hitler was already using force to gain his way with a programme of annexations. It was known that the offer of British support in the event of anyone threatening the independence of Poland had become relevant on the 1st September. Thus, Britain was under obligation to stand by her treaty.

An ultimatum issued by the British Government to Germany for the withdrawal of troops from Poland had been rejected by Hitler. Thus, the Prime Minister made his radio broadcast to the British people. The Matron of the Hospital at TreloarÕs had invited me into the hall where staff were assembled to listen to the announcement. I shall always remember the empty silence in that hospital in the moments that preceded the broadcast. When Mr. Neville Chamberlains, the British Prime Minister, came to the microphone to speak to the British nation he said:

ÒThis morning, the British Ambassador in Berlin handed the German government a final note stating that unless we heard from them by eleven oÕclock that they were prepared at once to withdraw their troops from Poland, a state of war would exist between us. I have to tell you now that no such undertaking has been received, and that consequently this country is at war with Germany.Ó

Those awesome words that came over the air on that peaceful Sunday morning stunned everyone into a silence like that which precedes an approaching storm. Within a few months, that storm front had broken for me, and I had become a Volunteer Reserve in the Royal Air Force.

A pre-arrangement with a elderly aunt of mine living in London was that if war was declared on 3rd September, I would drive direct from Alton to London, collect my aunt, and deliver her to some relatives in Berkshire. The general belief was that as soon as war had been declared, the German Luftwaffe would release an onslaught of bombers against major cities in BritainÑbut particularly on London. Having reached London in less than an hour and driving eastwards along the Great West Road, I noticed that the streets were almost deserted. I had seen some air-raid wardens ushering people into the shelters, and I realised that an alert had been sounded. My aunt lived in nearby Hounslow, and I arrived to find her and my uncle together with their dog in the air-raid shelter at the bottom of the garden, where I joined them until the all-clear was given.

As we found out later, soon after the declaration, two officers of the French Air Force had been on their way to join the Allied Air Mission in Britain. The Observer Corps had spotted the French plane crossing the coast and flying towards London, but they failed to identify the aircraft. However, it was plotted and transposed to the Operations Centre at Headquarters Fighter Command, who gave the signal ÒAir Raid Warning RedÓ. This brought the warning sirens into use, and the civilian populationÑbelieving that the German air raids had begunÑmade for the nearest shelters.

In the meantime, the French aircraft had landed at Croydon, a de-briefing had sorted the matter out, everything was in order, and the all-clear was sounded.

As it turned out, this was an excellent exercise to test not only the Air Defence System of the UK, but also the Civil Defence OrganisationÑall on the very first day that war had been declared.

If youÕre one of those people who like to leap straight into the cockpit and leave the details for later, hereÕs the shortest route to the open skies:

On the Main menu, choose Quick Start.

The game automatically recruits you for duty based on what plane you last selected in the Luftwaffe, Royal Air Force (RAF), or United States Army Air Force (USAAF) and designates where over Europe the air combat will unfold. European Air War also selects your armaments and makes all other pre-flight decisions.

Fly. The plane is already aloft and engaged with the enemy when you slide into the cockpit. The skill of your adversaries is based on the selection you made in the difficulty options. Your objective is simply to down them all before they do the same to you.

Quick Start missions use the same aircraft controls as the rest of the game. For details on how to pilot your plane, please refer to the Quick Reference Card and to the Flying a Single Mission section in this manual. Operations in Quick Start are small in scope, covering less terrain than other available flights, but they let you dive in and get your feet wet (preferably not in the drink). At missionÕs endÑ success or your own untimely demiseÑyou receive a mission summary report and then return to the Main menu.

FLYING A SINGLE MISSION

In the thick of war, thereÕs precious little time for showing young pilots more than the basics, but lack of experience will get you killed out there. DonÕt risk it allÑlife, limb, and love of flyingÑwithout adequate training and preparation. European Air WarÕs Single Mission feature lets you test the waters. Take the opportunity to practice the same manoeuvres time and again until you master them. Train in a particular type of mission or plane, or strive to be an all-around pilot with superior skills in a variety of different circumstances. You might even want to try flying your enemyÕs planes to see what advantages and disadvantages they may have. Single missions are also perfect for those not suited to the rigours of military life.

The Single Mission menu puts you at the controls, helping you design and carry out your own missions without having to answer to your superiors. You decide what kind of sortie to fly, and in which model of plane. You determine what enemy forces youÕll face. You choose your target. You even select the weather. Better yet, since youÕre not a career man, youÕve got nothing to lose. Here you have no past and no future, but can afford to live for the moment. Carpe diem!

Once you have selected the Single Mission option from the Main menu, you see a board posted with pictures of the different planes you can choose from. Each board contains only planes from one nationality. You can select a different nation by clicking on the name of the country at the bottom right, near the Exit button.

Since youÕll be flying one of the planes you order aloft, itÕs a good idea to pick something you actually want to pilot. Maybe youÕre training as a specialist in a particular make and model, or perhaps youÕd like to try something altogether new. In any case, be sure to settle on a plane that captures your interest. After you select a plane, you can set your mission parameters.

THE HANGAR

British Hurricanes await servicing in the hangar.

In the hangar, ground crews have been working feverishly for hours to prepare your plane. Your fuel tanks are topped off. Now itÕs time to make some final decisions before taxiing down the runway. Make your selections carefully, as theyÕll determine how difficult a mission you face.

You have several options as you wander around the hangar waiting for orders to man your craft. Use the mouse pointer to search the shed until youÕve found each one, or simply press the zto reveal them all.

MISSION PARAMETERS

Mission Parameters screen

The first time you create a mission, the parameters are on their standard settings. Thereafter, they default to those from the last sortie you prepared. Move around the document, clicking on the highlighted words to cycle through your available choices.

If, as you fill in your preferences, you find that things arenÕt turning out quite as youÕd planned, donÕt worry. You can go back and change things at any time; you can even reload and edit a mission after youÕve flown it and saved it.

TIME PERIOD

Select the year of battle. The date influences which aircraft models are in the mission; only those in production in the year you choose are available for you and your opponents to fly.

TIME OF DAY

Adjust the time of your take-off. Note that as your mission progresses, the light shifts to reflect the time of day (or night). Depending on the hour of take-off and the length of your flight, the sun may rise or set while youÕre aloft.

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WEATHER

Even a Group Commander doesnÕt have control over the weather during an operation, but then, he usually doesnÕt get to choose which planes the enemy plans to fly, nor how many of them heÕd like to meet in battle. So as long as weÕre departing from reality, we might as well go all the way.

Cloudy skies over England

Weather always has its say in determining if itÕs possible to take to the air on any given day, but during World War II this was especially true. In heavy cloud cover, lacking modern instruments and technologies, bombers couldnÕt bomb and pilots couldnÕt take off (or, worse, land). Yet weather could also turn the course of an aerial skirmish; a pilot might use a well-placed cloud or a strategic moment in the sun as effectively as a complicated manoeuvre to elude the enemy.

INSTANT ACTION

This option, available only on single missions, is for those players itching to get embroiled in the fray. Click in the box to proceed directly to the combat area (as in a Quick Start mission), with no lengthy flight to endure before you encounter the enemy.

MISSION TYPE

There are five basic mission types from which to choose. As each kind requires aircraft specially tailored for its different goals, your choice of mission will limit the models of plane available. Possible assignments include:

Fighter Sweep A fighter sweep is a flight designed to clear the skies and ground of enemy aircraft, often in preparation for a following strike force. Fighter planes fly ahead and soften an areaÕs defenses, clearing the way for bombers orÑless frequentlyÑa second wave of fighters. The more damage a sweep can inflict on its target, the greater the chance for a successful follow-up strike.

Bomb Target

This is a strike meant to damage and destroy enemy ground units

and structures. Oil plants, armament factories, sub pens, radar

towers, warehouses, bridges, hangars, and barracks all make

good marks. A strike often follows on the heels of a sweep,

hoping to catch fighters refueling from the earlier contest. Ideally,

you want to pounce before the enemy has had time to repair any

defensive installations or grounded aircraft that suffered damage

in the previous raid.

Interdiction

Less structured than other types of operations, these Òsearch and

destroyÓ flights generally patrol a particular area, attacking any

targets of opportunity encountered. These might include enemy

planes, air control towers, hangars, anti-aircraft guns, trains, and

convoys of ships or trucks.

Escort

Escorts protect other aircraft, most often ungainly bombers,

from enemy planes as they fly toward and over a target area.

Frequently, escorts pass in the wake of a fighter sweep, which

attempts to poke holes in the air defense system around the

mark. Escorts hover near their more vulnerable compatriots,

straying only as far as needed to protect against enemy threats.

The survival of escort planes is incidental; their primary concern

is to give the convoy safe passage to the target.

Intercept

Intercepts are defensive flights dispatched to head off enemy

aircraft. You must try by whatever means necessary to disrupt

and disband attacking formations before they can inflict any

damage.

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TARGET

Each time you select a target, it is marked on a large map of the European theatre. You can scroll the map in each direction by moving your mouse pointer to an edge. On the map, each target available for the selected time period is represented by a small white box. To select a target, place your mouse cursor on or near the white box (until the name of the target appears), then click.

NUMBER OF AIRCRAFT

This determines the number of friendlies. Depending on the number of primary and secondary planes you order up, you have the power to crowd the skies over Europe. If youÕre angling for overwhelming aerial superiority, go for broke and assign as many planes as possible, but if heavily congested airways donÕt appeal, you might consider something more modest.

CRUISE ALTITUDE

Select one of three different cruise altitudes: Low, Medium, or High. You can also use Random, to make each mission different.

HOME BASE

To a career pilot, home base represents everything. ItÕs a safe haven after flying an operation, the chance for a meal, a shower, and bed, and itÕs where fellow airmen gather to share harrowing tales and stories of stunning success. But for you, home base is simply where all missions begin and end.

Your current home base appears on the mission parameter sheet. To specify a new home base for your mission, click on the name of the base. A map of Europe fills the screen, showing the available bases represented by white squares, your current base represented by your national insignia, and your target represented by a red square and an X. The white squares reflect the approximate locations of your countryÕs actual bases of operation during the war. As you pass the mouse over each square, its name appears.

When you are selecting a home base, keep in mind your planeÕs fuel consumption and capacity. (Your range is marked on the map.) You need to have enough fuel for a dogfight and the return trip home. Click on the base that suits, and you return to the Mission Parameters screen, which now displays your chosen command post. To return from the map without designating a home base, simply press q. If you wish to view areas of the map that are currently off-screen, move the mouse pointer to the extreme edge of the chart, and you can pan up, down, or over.

FRIENDLY SUPPORT ACTIVITY: SECONDARY AIRCRAFT

Of all the criteria for your mission, none has more import than the planes you send out for both sides. Different models of aircraft have different strengths and weaknesses. Tightness of turn, dive speed, service ceiling, and acceleration all vary according to a craftÕs design, and your planeÕs performance relative to your adversariesÕ determines whether you will be fairly matched. Each time you select a plane, the second picture on the right side of the screen changes to show that aircraft.

By opting for a specific mission type, you have already limited the models available for your sortie; for instance, a bomber cannot be the primary aircraft on a fighter sweep. The planes have to be suited to the mission at hand.

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FORMATION SIZE

Determine the size of the formation of your secondary aircraft. Remember that, in general, the greater the number of planes flying on a mission, the slower the game performs. (This is also affected by the way you have configured the game options.)

PILOT SKILL LEVEL

Most flight instructors say thereÕs no substitute for innate intelligence when it comes to being a pilot. If you havenÕt got it in the brains department, there isnÕt much anyone can do. But they also admit that grey matter isnÕt all that counts when it comes to being a good aviator. Experience and skill can carry you almost as far.

European Air War allows you to adjust the skill level of the computer pilots, both friend and foe. (SorryÑthereÕs no comparable feature to enhance your own level of play.) Choosing between Green, Seasoned, and Expert, you can select the average level of pilot skill. This is not a guarantee that you wonÕt encounter airmen of different experience levels. When you check Seasoned, for example, you might still run into the occasional greenhorn or ace.

EXPECTED ENEMY ACTIVITY: ACTIVITY LEVEL

Set this activity level to reflect the approximate number of enemy craft youÕd like to take on with each encounter. Whereas European Air War permits you to pick exactly how many of your countryÕs aircraft set out on a mission, your choices for enemy flights are limited to Light, Moderate, Heavy or Random.

PRIMARY AIRCRAFT

Select the type of aircraft you want the enemy to have as their primary plane. Each time you click on a selection, the third picture on the right side of the screen will change to the plane you just selected.

SECONDARY AIRCRAFT

Select the type of aircraft you want the enemy to have as their secondary plane. Each time you click on a selection, the last picture on the right side of the screen will change to the plane you just selected. Your choices might be restricted based on the type of mission.

AAA ACTIVITY LEVEL

Select the amount of anti-aircraft artillery activity you want to fly against. The higher the activity level you ask for, the greater chance the enemy will have of hitting you, since more flak with be flying in the air.

SAVING A MISSION

Once you have gone through and set all the mission parameters, chances are youÕll want to save the script to fly (or edit) later. If so, simply click on the Save button.

At this point you have a couple of options for naming the new mission. You can save the scenario under the default name (the two primary aircraft), or type in a different name.

When youÕve chosen a name for the mission, click Save. If by chance you should pick the same name as an existing saved mission, you are prompted to confirm your choice (and permanently overwrite the old mission). Click Change to enter a different name for the scenario, or use Save to replace the older version with the one you have just created.

Naturally, if at any time you decide not to save your mission, use the Cancel button to return to the Mission Parameters screen.

But what happens if you elect to fly your mission without saving it, later to discover that youÕd like to keep the set-up after all? As long as you havenÕt created another scenario, you can still go back and save it. Call up the Mission Parameters screen from the Single Mission menu. The settings reflect the last mission you designed. Simply click Save and proceed from there.

LOADING A MISSION

Starting a mission that you have saved is a snapÑjust choose Load from the Mission Parameters screen. A window opens listing all the saved missions. Use the mouse pointer to highlight the mission you plan to fly (you may need to scroll up or down the list) and then click on it. Next, click Load (again). The screen of parameters should pop up. At this point, you can:

1)Fly the mission as is.

2)Tinker with the mission conditions and then fly it immediately.

3)Fine-tune the parameters and save the mission for future play, then fly the newly saved scenario.

Click on Cancel if you decide not to load a mission design after all.

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MAKING REVISIONS

Sometimes, after you fly a mission, you realize that it doesnÕt quite measure up. The plane doesnÕt respond as well as you had hoped, or the weatherÕs not right, or you made the enemy too weak. Whatever the reason, you can always modify an existing mission. Load the old version (see above), which calls up the screen of parameters. Make your changes, and then save the new edition. Saving it under the same name will permanently delete the older copy, so if you wish to preserve the original version, save your current changes under a different moniker.

ARMAMENTS BOARD

Before leaving the hangar, you should check out the Armaments Board. Here, you select the weapons package you want the ground crew to load on board your plane and your wingmanÕs. Click on the chalkboard to get to this screen.

Loading out

Your armament options vary according to the type of aircraft and the kind of operation youÕre undertaking. On a quick sweep, for instance, you might not be allowed to carry bombs, since the extra weight would slow you down and limit your manoeuvrability. On the other hand, a heavy external drop tank might be just the thing; although it will initially curb your speed, it will also increase your range, and you should be able to jettison the tank before it affects your manoeuvrability in close combat.

Highlight and click on the first flight you wish to arm, then cycle through the ordnance packages to be had. Your selections appear in writing next to the plane. On the projection screen to the right, you can see a slide of the load-out actually in place on the aircraft.

Select a load-out for each flight on the dayÕs run, then click OK to return to the hangar. There you can at last begin your mission.

Ground crews like these, photographed in the early 1950s, stow your ammo and bombs aboard.

FLY MISSION

YouÕve now cast the players and handed out the scripts, but be ready for a little improvisation once you get in the air. The beauty of European Air WarÕs single flights is their lack of predictability. The game takes the settings youÕve plugged in and, within that set of limitations, generates an encounter. This means that with the exact same setup, you can end up in an almost infinite variety of skirmishes. You never know precisely what to expect.

Now that you have your mission loaded and customized to please, itÕs time to don your flight jacket and boots. Click on Fly Mission to climb into your plane and prepare to take the enemy by storm.

TAKE-OFF

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ItÕs show time! Slip on your parachute, adjust your scarf and goggles, and join your fellow airmen as they stride confidently toward their planes. Already, the buzz of engines fills the air. The first few flights clear the runway. After a final check with your ground crew chief, you climb aboard, strap yourself in, and prepare for take-off.

Almost every mission requires that you get off the ground. ThereÕs no two ways about it, but how you actually rise to the skies is up to you. Takeoffs can be tricky for the uninitiated. Lucky for you, European Air War lets you avoid them altogether, if you so desire. Just sit back and let the autopilot take over; itÕll see you into the air and on your way without a hitch.

Lifting off

If, on the other hand, you think youÕre up to the challenge, hereÕs the procedure:

1)Extend your flaps.

2)Start the engines by pressing s+[for a single engine plane and s+]to start the second engine in a twin engine craft like the P-38 and the BF-110.

3)Give your engines 90 or 100% throttle by pressing 9or s+=.

4)Press Bto release the wheel brakes.

5)Roll forward until your plane gains sufficient momentum. The exact speed needed for a smooth take-off differs according to the model of plane, but itÕs roughly 100Ð120 mph (160Ð195 kph) for each of the aircraft you can pilot in European Air War.

6)Pull gently back on the stick to ease your plane off the ground.

7)As soon as you are fully airborne, raise the landing gear (press G). This will reduce drag and improve lift.

8)When youÕre safely a thousand feet or so above the ground, pull in your flaps.

Once aloft, climb to a comfortable cruising altitude. How high you want to fly depends on your mission. To offer any protection, escort planes must remain fairly close to their bombers, but on other types of operations, your intended style of approach will determine your precise cruising altitude. Generally, greater height gives increased visibility and a better energy state.

At this point you can loosen up just slightly and give yourself a small pat on the back. You made it, but the best is yet to come.

GETTING THERE

Career pilots are under orders to fly a particular plane and to assume a particular role in flight formations. The pilot of a single mission does not have the same constraints. As your mission gets underway, you will find yourself in the lead plane of the primary flight (except on escorts, in which you will be the lead of the secondary flight). If youÕre comfortable with your plane and your role, great. If not, you can always change aircraft. Inexperienced pilots, for example, should probably not assume the lead; they have much to learn by trailing and watching their more seasoned cohorts. (See Viewpoint and the Camera: Changing Planes.)

Crossing the English Channel

Take some time at the outset to learn about your plane. The more you know about how it handles in different conditions, the better off you are in combat. Experiment with different manoeuvres and learn how to make your craft do what you want it to do. YouÕve got to control it, not let it control you.

THE COCKPIT CONTROLS

Before engaging in battle, you have to know your way around the cockpit of your craft. An explanation of the various dials and gauges can be found in the PilotÕs Handbook, but here are a few notes on other features available as you pilot your plane.

MISSION MAP

Conveniently stashed in the cockpit is your very own map of Europe. When you press a+M, the map appears; itÕs a good idea to give the autopilot control of the plane before you open the map. Otherwise, you might want to pause the action once you have unfolded the map. Press a+Pto do so. This allows you to take a good, long gander without losing any of your flight time. To restart the action, use a+Pagain.

Consult the map to review your intended flight path; icons plot the progress of all friendly aircraft. Press qor any of the view keys to exit the map. You return to the cockpit in the standard forward-facing view (or whatever view you selected). Your plane is moving at normal speed (unless you chose to pause the action).

COCKPIT RADIO

Combat pilots rely heavily on their vision and intuition to see them through battle, but their radio is also an important ally, a vital link to fellow airmen. European Air WarÕs cockpit radio allows direct communication between you and the other pilots on your side. Call out a warningÑBandits at ten oÕclock!Ñask for help, or listen in as your flight leader issues new orders. Just be quick about it; youÕve still got a plane to fly.

To initiate radio communication, use the t. A menu appears, listing the people you can contact by radioÑyour squadron and Ground Control are on the same frequency; if there are other squadrons involved in your mission, theyÕre on another frequency, and you cannot communicate with them. Press the key that corresponds to the intended receiver of your message.

When youÕre prompted, choose what type of communication you wish to send. If you donÕt see the exact command youÕre looking for, try the three menusÑ Tactical, Formation, and Navigation.

Finally, choose the statement you want to pass along. If you have opted to issue a command, you must select not only an action, but also the specific target. Pressing qat any time cancels your message.

Radio Commands

Commands are best sent before battle. How well commands are followed depends on pilot morale and skill. Dogfights can be quite chaotic, and you canÕt reasonably expect a rookie pilot to be able to quickly and efficiently rejoin you in tight formation during a heated battle. All pilots will do their best to follow orders, but donÕt always expect immediate compliance. As the British learned early on, itÕs difficult to remain in formation (which requires a constant eye to avoid collisions), and watch your enemies (and dodge their guns). ItÕs normally wise to break apart or at least loosen formation prior to battle.

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If you are the lead plane in an element, you can send commands to your wingman (you might sometimes have two), regardless of relative rank. If you are the flight leader (number one), you can command your entire flight. Only if you are the squadron leader can you send orders to other flights, or to the squadron as a whole.

Depending on the situation, you can issue some or all of the following orders to your wingman. (The default is Cover Me, so if you want any other behaviour, you must order it.)

Engage

Attack the enemy. If enemies have been sighted, your wingman is

Bandits

free to break off and engage. If there are no enemies in sight, he

waits, then breaks off as soon as you make contact.

Cover Me

Stay in formation, but if an enemy targets the lead plane (you),

break off and attack until the threat is removed, then return to

formation.

Attack

Drop bombs (or launch rockets) at the missionÕs ground targets.

Ground Targets

If out of formation, but in the general area, attack whatever is the lead planeÕs target at the time the command is issued. If in formation, stay in formation and fire at whatever enemy the lead plane attacks. (As in all combat situations, self-preservation can supersede orders; your wingman might need to break off from time to time to avoid enemy fire.)

Disengage

Break off the attack on the current target. Lacking other orders,

your wingman will probably return to formation, but might take

shots at any easy targets on the way.

Regroup

Give priority to getting back in formationÑavoid enemies when

possible in order to rejoin the lead. (In general, if you are trying to

get planes back into formation, flying straight and slow makes it

easier for everyone catch up and get in place.)

Target

Attack enemies. The target commands are on the Tactical sub-

menu. There are three choices: Target All, Target Fighters and

Target Bombers. These order your wingman to focus the attack

on the type of plane you specify (or all enemies). This overrides

the default attack orders for the mission (for example, on a

Bomber Intercept, the default is to target bombers).

Break

The Break commands are also on the tactical sub-menu. You can

order you wingman to break Right, Left, High, or Low. This tells

him to separate form you in the specified direction, generally so

that the two of you can attack a target from different directions.

Drop Tanks

Release the external fuel tank.

If you are the flight leader, you can issue nearly all of the same orders to your flight. The exception is that you cannot order the whole flight to Attack My Target. There are a few additional flight commands.

Tighten

Close up the formation. This command is on the Formation sub-

Formation

menu. Tight formations look better, and when attacking bombers

can result in more concentrated firepower, but the disadvantages

normally outweigh the advantages.

Loosen

Spread the formation out a bit, normally about double the current

Formation

space. This command is on the Formation sub-menu.

Checkpoint

You use the Next and Previous checkpoint orders to get a

loitering flight to continue on course or backtrack. (These

commands are on the Navigation sub-menu.) The map includes

navigation checkpoints, in case any plane becomes lost or gets

hung up engaging the enemy, and these commands tell the flight

to move to one of those checkpoints.

Loiter Here

Circle the current position and await further orders. This

command is on the Navigation sub-menu.

Return To

Ground control normally gives this order, but as leader, you can

Base

decide (if youÕre massively overwhelmed, for example) to retreat

and return home. Your mission will likely be considered a failure,

but thatÕs better than failing the mission and getting everyone

shot down. This command is on the Navigation sub-menu.

If youÕre the squadron leader, you can give orders to flights other than your own, and to the squadron as a whole. Squadron Commands are the same as the flight commands, except that you can choose to issue them to the whole squadron or to a specific flight.

39

Ground Control

You can use the radio to call ground control and request a vector to the nearest enemy, a vector to your friendly bombers (if youÕre on an escort mission), or a vector back to home base. The vectors to the bandits and bombers are intercept vectorsÑthe suggested heading for quickest intercept. Note that ground control is based on primitive radar and a network of civilian spotters. Therefore, some of the ground control information might be less than accurate.

You can call ground control to request assistanceÑadditional fighters scrambled to help you out. Depending on how well the battle or war is going, there might or might not be any available.

Cockpit Red Light

Night missions were perilous affairs prior to the advent of radar. Nonetheless, wartime strategy requires from time to time that an operation begin before dawn or near dusk, and so your plane comes equipped with a small light to illuminate the cockpit dials. (In the dark, your instrument panel can be hard to read.) Since a bright white light could significantly reduce your night vision, the bulb produces a soft red glow. To turn it on or off, press s+L. The light works only after dark.

AUTOPILOT

All of the planes come equipped with an autopilot that can take over control of your craft in flight. (Historical purists should know that few of the aircraft you can pilot in European Air War actually had an autopilot installed, and none had one as sophisticated as this. It has been included strictly to ease game play in certain situations.) Upon encountering enemy aircraft, the autopilot notifies you of their presence and disengages itself, leaving you once again at the helm. Autopilot can also assume command during take-off to ensure that you get safely aloft. Of course, under no circumstances can autopilot save you when your craft has been damaged beyond controlÑyou must bail out.

VIEWPOINT AND THE CAMERA

Now that youÕve had a chance to get acquainted with the inside of your cockpit, take a peek at the world outside the plane. ItÕs time to try out the various viewpoints and your external camera.

F-KEY VIEWS

The F-key Views are a standard feature of many flight simulations. Pressing one of the numbered function keys changes your point of view. There is a slight overlap of views, so that you have no blind spots. The views are:

1

Standard front-facing cockpit view

2

Right wing, front view

3

Right wing, rear view

4

Over right shoulder view

5

Over left shoulder view

6

Left wing, rear view

7

Left wing, front view

Use swith any of these keys to get a 45-degree up version of the same view.

Full Up view

Lap view

There are a number of other controls that change your point of view. Most of these are for the external camera and are discussed in a later subsection. The other important ones are listed here:

c+1 Lap view

Lower your eyes as low as possible to view the

instrument panel

8Virtual Cockpit Activate the Virtual Cockpit mode (see below)

SNAP VIEWS

Snap Views allow you to quickly scan a field of vision using the numeric keypad. The key layout is designed in a very easy to use, logical order. The views are:

Numpad 1

Left Shoulder

Numpad 2

Six (blind spot)

Numpad 3

Right Shoulder

Numpad 4

Left Rear

Numpad 5

Up*

Numpad 6

Right Rear

Numpad 7

Left Front

Numpad 8

Front

Numpad 9

Right Front

Numpad 0

Instruments

European Air War Windows 10

* You can use the Numpad 5key in combination with the other snap views to get a high view. For example, 5+3looks up and over your right shoulder.

CHANGING PLANES

On single missions (but not on career operations or in multi-player games), pressing c+6allows you to jump into the cockpit of a different plane. This can come in handy. As a rookie, it might be more useful to assume position as a wingman than to fly the lead plane. You can gain valuable experience just by watching your more accomplished flight mates. Others (those with sadly deficient morals) might want to change planes after their own has been badly torn up. Repeatedly pressing c+6cycles you through each available aircraft on your mission (flyable planes only). Cycle too far, though, and youÕll end up back in your original crate.

TARGETING

As a convenience, and to help simulate the way a pilot locks his attention onto a specific target and estimates the distance to it, you have the option of using the not-quite-historically-accurate Targeting feature.

Gog-games.com › Game › European_air_warEuropean Air War - Download Free GOG PC Games

Closest Enemy c+Tputs the target marker on the enemy plane nearest you, and labels that marker with the name of the plane and its distance from you.