Backing Up Mac Operating System Before Installing New Hard Drive

What You’ll Need. You’ll need two things to create your bootable backup: An external hard drive as big as your Mac’s internal drive. All files on your external drive will be deleted during the backup, so don’t use your Time Machine drive or a drive you use to store important things on. AppleInsider took a look at some of the options for backing up your Mac before installing OS X Yosemite. Pick up an external hard drive. M1 Max 16-inch MacBook Pro versus Mac Pro. How to Backup a Mac to an External Hard Drive in 2021. Backing up your Mac on a regular basis is one of the best things you can do. Through the use of Time Machine and an external hard drive, we. Dec 10, 2021 Migrating Mac Os To New Hard Drive. On your old Mac: If you started your old Mac in target disk mode or are migrating from a Time Machine backup, skip these two steps. If you see a security code, make sure that it's the same code as on your new Mac. On your new Mac: Choose the backup to transfer information from. The new drive should appear in Windows Explorer. Before you can access a new or formatted drive in your operating system, you need to initialize it first and then create a partition on the drive. A partition defines an area of the drive to use for storing data. The partition uses a file system (for example, HFS+, ex-FAT, NTFS, and so on).

  1. Backing Up Mac Operating System Before Installing New Hard Drive Windows 10
  2. Backing Up Mac Operating System Before Installing New Hard Drive Won T Boot
  3. Backing Up Mac Operating System Before Installing New Hard Drive Causes Slow Boot On Mac

Backing Up Mac Operating System Before Installing New Hard Drive Windows 10

Active4 years, 3 months ago

I'm looking to upgrade a 120GB SSD in my late 2009 iMac (21.5in) to a 250GB SSD. My mac is running the latest version of MacOS.

I have an external USB drive which I will be setting up to create a Time Machine backup. My understanding is that once the backup has completed, I swap my internal SSD with the new SSD. Then, with keeping the USB Drive with Time Machine backup on it connected, I boot to it and some sort of Disk Utility software will walk me through restoring the Time Machine backup to my newly installed drive.

Operating

Backing Up Mac Operating System Before Installing New Hard Drive Won T Boot

This is all good, but I have read mixed information about whether or not the Time Machine backup includes a complete backup of data and OS or if I will need to install the OS onto the new drive and update it before restoring from the Time Machine.

Backing Up Mac Operating System Before Installing New Hard Drive Causes Slow Boot On Mac

I don't have a physical copy of the OS, so it concerns me a little. It's a second-hand Mac and came with El Capitan installed.

Does a Time Machine backup contain the OS as well so it's as simple as boot to a Disk Utility and tell it to restore from Time Machine to the new SSD?

My first Mac, so thanks for any help!

David
DavidDavid

If you haven‘t defined any exclusions in the Time Machine options then your backup drive will contain a full backup including system, apps, and user data.

To restore, you connect the backup drive to your Mac and press cmd-R when starting up. This will start from the Recovery system invisibly contained on the Time Machine disk. You’ll see an assistant window from which you select the first item, “Restore From Time Machine Backup“. Then you can select which of the saved backups you want to restore.

It’s as easy as that. But please make sure you use this mechanism only to restore a system onto the very same Mac you made the backup of. Don’t use it to restore a backup onto a different machine type as it could break your system if build versions don’t match hardware requirements. Should you want to restore a backup onto another system, Apple recommends you to use Migration Assistant (in /Applications/Utilities).

Tetsujin
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Tom ETom E
2

You need to create a bootable USB before you do anything else. See this:

Also, while you should definitely make a full Time Machine backup, you can also use the old SSD as the backup from which you restore to the new disk. Essentially, as soon as you remove the disk, it becomes the backup.

Zonker.in.GenevaZonker.in.Geneva
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